10 Games With A Person’s Name In The Title

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Do you think many people like the sound of their own name? It must feel terribly awkward to have your name attached to something like it’s a quantifier of the work. Even weirder if you’ve not actually worked on the game.

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Plenty of the time, it’s probably a marketing tool, or a licencing issue and so on. Seeing one person’s name above everyone else’s though is an undeniably odd thing that feels a bit exclusionary. There’s an unsettling amount of games that do it, too. Let’s see if they’re worthy of the moniker.

10 Ken Follett’s The Pillars Of Earth

Ken Follett's Pillars of Earth in-game scene of two characters sat under a tree by a stream

Writer Ken Follett is known for the diversity of his books. They stretch from spy thrillers to historical accounts, altering with each book release. The Pillars of Earth was one of his first forays into historical fiction, depicting the creation of a grand cathedral.

In the aptly named adaptation of his book by Daedelic Entertainment, you get to witness this cathedral’s construction with your own eyes. Taking place in the fictional Kingsbridge, you play as multiple characters across the years in a game with a wonderfully unique art style.

9 Clive Barker’s Jericho

Clive Barkers Jericho Enemy Attack

Clive Barker is another writer who is no stranger to adaptations of his works. Coming to fame with his horror books, adaptions of his works have given birth to some of the genre’s most beloved forces, such as Pinhead and Candyman.

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Clive Barker’s Jericho is far from the only game the eponymous man has worked on, though is perhaps the most well-known. It has you playing as a specialized squad known as Jericho, each with a unique playstyle. The game has a suitably unsettling atmosphere, having you delve deeper into the very creation of humanity, and the failures associated with it.

8 John Carpenter’s Toxic Commando

John Carpenter's Toxic Commando screenshot showing an armoured vehicle with a minigun shooting zombies

Though John Carpenter may be more well-known for his films like Halloween, he’s never shied away from his own love of video games. In fact, he’s already been a writer on the Fear games and has stated many times over his wants to work on a Sonic the Hedgehog game. A true visionary.

Well, the horror director has finally gotten his name attached to a video game! John Carpenter’s Toxic Commando is…a zombie buddy-shooter with ’80s movie vibes. An interesting choice by all means, though not exactly the form Carpenter has previously worked in. There’s always a first time, though.

7 Marc Ecko’s Getting Up: Contents Under Pressure

Trane from Marc Ecko's Getting Up Tagging A Van

Marc Ecko is a fashion designer and owner of many other companies. He got his start in art from graffiti before turning that into company ownership. Big leap. It does, however, give a rather logical step into the creation of his one and only video game.

Marc Ecko’s Getting Up: Contents Under Pressure takes place in a near future dystopia. You play as Trane, someone whose primary power in fighting back against the regime is spray paint and a rebellious mind. It wasn’t exceedingly well-received, but there’s definitely some heart and commentary in there.

6 Tony Hawk’s Skateboarding

A skateboarder performs a trick on the Downhill Jam level

We all know Tony Hawk. Yes, the man is famed for being a skateboarding legend, but did you know he retired in 1999? That was the same year the first Pro Skater game was released. It’s funny seeing that his skateboarding fame directly contributed to his mainstream appeal even post full retirement in 2003.

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To choose a single Tony Hawk’s game would be pretty hard considering how many there are. The Pro Skater games were the original, but some of the most beloved. Then there’s American Wasteland, which added more than just skateboards for you to perform tricks on. They’re a legendary set of games that helped popularise skateboarding games as a whole.

5 Tom Clancy’s Adaptations

The Division 2's New Game Mode Pushed Back To February 2022

Tom Clancy’s The Division 2 Official Screenshot From Twitter

Tom Clancy, famed for his books with a rather favorable view of war crimes, has had plenty of generic games centered around his ‘ideas’. Just about all of them have been created by Ubisoft, which continues to milk his American exceptionalism even after his death.

It’s hard to describe the binding thread of the Tom Clancy games other than ‘shoot the bad guy’, with the bad guy often being a non-white or Eastern European person – which is probably accurate to the books, unfortunately.

4 Peter Jackson’s King Kong: The Official Game Of The Movie

King Kong destroying cars in New York in Peter Jackson's King Kong

Peter Jackson has made plenty of beloved films, almost all of them filmed in New Zealand. It’s a country filled with stunning vistas and poor labor laws, making it a prime location for filming. But did you know King Kong was also from New Zealand? True story.

The video game adaptation is great, because not only does it have one of the longest video game titles, (creator names tend to add to the length), but it also has fun stylistic differences between playing as the Great Ape himself in third-person and the humans who are hilariously out of their depth in the limited UI first-person.

3 Dr. Kawashima’s Brain Training

The polygonal face of Dr Kawashima from Brain Training on a lined white background

Nintendo has always been known for creating fun and quirky games that stretch across plenty of genres. Brain Age, or the more inspiration-focused Dr. Kawashima’s Brain Training, has a rather unconventional person’s work to pull from – neuroscientist Ryuta Kawashima.

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The game is based on Dr. Kawashima’s research on how to keep your brain healthy and youthful. These games center around a series of minigames like sudoku, memorization, color separation, and the like. How effective they are as a game is debatable, though they’re undeniably fun.

2 Getting Over It With Bennett Foddy

Man in pot pushing himself off of rock in Getting Over It with Bennett Foddy

Bennett Foddy is one of the few video game creators that actually attaches his name to the title of his games. Well, at least one of them. Coming to fame from the limb-actuation extravaganza that was QWOP, his real masterpiece is Getting Over It.

Getting Over It is, in every essence of the word, a commentary. It became a viral sensation due to the absurdity of the concept, and also the sheer difficulty. However, Bennett Foddy himself commentated the entire game, using it as an allegory for literally getting over obstacles, the difficulty of game design, and plenty more. It’s more than its difficulty.

1 Sid Meier’s Anything

Sid Meier’s Civilization VI Anno 2205

There are plenty of famed names in gaming, yet few are bold enough to attach themselves to their games’ titles. Sid Meier has, over the decades, become a signifier of something more. It’s almost a quality mark for a very specific type of strategy game.

That said, the man has worked on much more than just strategy. He’s a catch-all in the games he works on, being a developer, producer, overseer, and everything in between. It’s all a team effort though, and there’s always a simple joy to be found in the Sid Meier games.

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