Denmark mocked for recalling Korean ramen for being too spicy

Denmark’s food agency has recalled three flavors of Samyang’s instant ramen line, claiming that the chili extract included in three of its popular products could “poison consumers.”

Three “fiery” flavors of South Korean instant ramen noodles have been withdrawn: Buldak 3x Spicy & Hot Chicken, 2x Spicy & Hot Chicken, and Hot Chicken Stew.

However, the ramen makers disputed claims that the product was “too spicy” and claimed there was no problem with the quality of their products, adding that Danes simply can’t take the heat.

The Danish Veterinary and Food Administration announced the recall on Tuesday, citing high levels of capsaicin in the three recalled products, Caregiver reports.

“If you have the products, you should throw them away or return them to the store where they were purchased,” the organization said in a statement.

Capsaicin is an extract of cold peppers that can cause nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea and burning when consumed in extreme amounts, according to Poison.org.

She also issued a special warning against children eating the noodles and urged parents to contact their local poison control hotline if their children show “acute symptoms”.

Samyang later released a statement forBBCwhich stopped Denmark’s response and reassured consumers.

“We understand that the Danish Food Authority has recalled the products, not because of a problem with their quality, but because they were too spicy.

“Products are exported worldwide,” the company added. “But this is the first time they have been recalled for the above reason.”

A woman tries to eat spicy instant ramen, which is now banned in Denmark

Everyone has a different tolerance for spicy food, but the actual scientific consensus on whether spicy food can affect your health is pretty mixed, research A conversation found October 2023.

Currently, evidence from large population studies suggests that spicy foods do not increase the risk of all-cause mortality in the population and may actually reduce the risk.

Paul Terry, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Tennessee who wrote the paper, explained that studies on the potential risks and benefits of long-term consumption of spicy foods have been ongoing for many years, and the results are influenced by a number of different factors. .

“Currently, evidence from large population studies suggests that spicy foods do not increase the risk of all-cause mortality in the population and may actually reduce the risk,” he wrote.

“However, when considering the results of these studies, remember that what people eat is part of a larger set of lifestyle factors – such as physical activity, relative body weight, and tobacco and alcohol use – that also have health consequences. “

Since the announcement of the recall, social media users have been divided, with some agreeing that the noodles are unbearably hot.

“A half-Korean friend of mine introduced me to these, saying he enjoys them as a ‘stress reliever’ – and it works! When your head explodes from this level of spiciness, you forget all the stress at work,” one wrote on Reddit.

“My wife (Thai) loves spicy food, but even she could barely stand the 3x spicy from Samyang,” added another.

As someone else said, “Surprisingly, no, I couldn’t feel them burning through my entire system except on the way out.”

However, many had a field day mocking the Danes for not being able to handle the spice.

“It’s stupid, the packaging has a clear warning that it may be spicy,” scoffed one.

“I had a friend from Denmark who thought the bland breaded shrimp with a little ground pepper was too spicy,” joked another.

While one Dane said: “A few years ago my grandfather visited me and complained about how spicy the food was. It had garlic in it.”

A TikTok trend that involves tasting “hot” noodles on camera to get a real-time reaction has resulted in many videos of people eating ramen.

One woman, who uses the handle @ellasavoiee, filmed herself eating the taste of the 2x spicy and hot chicken, describing it as “the next level of spicy”.

“Oh my god, I’m sweating and my mouth is burning,” she says while munching on the popular dish in the video.

“I don’t even know how you can enjoy this level of spice because I can’t even feel my mouth.”

Read related topics:Tik Tok

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