Avowed Isn’t In Alpha Yet, Graphics Will Be “Refined”

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A developer at Obsidian has confirmed that Avowed isn’t even in an alpha state yet, and that the game’s art will be “refined” in various ways before launch.



Last week at Xbox’s Summer Showcase, we finally got another look at Obsidian’s Avowed, three years after its first trailer. Although our first look at the game was shown as Obsidian’s take on Skyrim, a gameplay trailer and subsequent interviews confirmed that its scope has been reduced and the focus shifted to RPG elements instead of a large open world. It also has a different art style than what we saw in the reveal trailer, looking more in line with The Outer Worlds than the photorealistic look that was originally teased.

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As you can imagine, this new look and changed direction disappointed some players, some complained about the game’s new visuals, suggesting they were downgraded from the original revealalthough this felt more like a proof-of-concept trailer than anything else.

Developer Obsidian comments on Avowed graphics.
Image: RPG Codex

If you’re worried about the look of Avowed, it might be worth holding off until the game is closer to release. As Twitter user Klobrille pointed outObsidian developer with the username Briar Diem recently shared some details about the game’s development on the RPG Codex forums, confirming that the game isn’t even in alpha yet and that its visuals will be “refined” in various ways.

Briar Diem said: “All I can say is that the game hasn’t entered alpha yet, the art will be refined in various ways. The lighting will change. Although of course the designs won’t change. They are what they are”, and confirmed that Avowed’s graphics are not final and will be improved as the game develops.

Elsewhere on the forums, Briar Diem also responded to a comment claiming that we would see the return of “Bugsidian”, saying: “On previous projects, alpha periods sometimes only lasted a few months. This is actually the longest we’ll have Alpha/Beta period for any game at Obsidian, which is good news.”

It’s a surprisingly positive comment given all the negativity surrounding the game on the forum, but Briar Diem also warned that the community is so “toxic” that “no one could touch it with a 10-foot pole under official conditions.” Diem notes that he personally doesn’t care about the negativity and sees value in engaging with the community, but it’s a reminder that these games come from actual people with feelings, and that it might be best to hold off on criticism and harsh words until the game is not actually over.

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